Health-e-Recipe Champion: Brussels Sprouts Beat Brownies

We all know Brussels sprouts are healthy. They’re an excellent source of vitamin A, C, K, fiber and folate. As a cruciferous vegetable, they’re rich in carotenoids and glucosinolates, phytochemicals that both show an ability to reduce inflammation, neutralize carcinogens and control abnormal cell growth in lab studies.

Brussles and Brownies

Brussels sprouts are always humble champions.

But no one ever said they were better than brownies…until now. After 4 weeks, 16 recipes and over 1300 votes, the most controversial vegetable has been declared the winner of AICR’s Recipe Contest. Competing against colorful salads, spicy soups, classic comfort foods and even our famous brownies, it definitely earned its spot as our 500th Health-e-Recipe.

So take the challenge, and try out the winning recipe for yourself. Head over to our Facebook page to tell us what you think and you could win a New American Plate cookbook, filled with tasty, healthy recipes to try. Continue reading


Study: Smaller Food Pieces May Up Your Calories

When will you eat a cup of food that is half the calories of another cup of that same food? When that food is made of larger, fluffier pieces, suggests a new study. top view of various kids cereals in colorful bowls on wooden tab

The study, published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, focused on breakfast cereals. By eating flakes that were larger and took up more space in the bowl, people ate 100 calories less for breakfast than when eating the smaller, denser flaked cereal.

The findings relate to AICR’s recommendation for cancer prevention on eating mainly plant foods, which are low in calorie (energy) density. Bite for bite, many vegetables and other plant foods contain relatively few calories. That can help with weight control, which in turn reduces cancer risk. In the study, each week for four weeks, 41 breakfast eaters were offered 10 ounces (280 grams) of Wheaties.

Unbeknownst to them, the flake size was changed. One week they were served the cereal as packaged, considered the standard. The other three weeks they were given cereals where the flakes were crushed to 80%, 60% or 40% of the standard. As the flakes got smaller, the cereal took up less room in the bowl. Continue reading


The Beauty of Beets…Countdown to Vote

beet-salad croppedOnce you’ve tasted fresh beets, you’ll be enchanted by their sweet taste and beautiful color. Our Health-e-Recipe for Beet, Carrot and Apple Salad shreds them with tart Granny Smith apples, carrots and chopped walnuts into a cancer-preventive salad.

Beets contain potassium, vitamin C, folate and fiber. Their phytochemicals include betalains, a class of health-protecting compounds that may be best absorbed when uncooked. Beet greens – which can be eaten lightly steamed – provide lutein, a phytochemical that protects eyesight and is also found in spinach (a botanical relative of beets).

In the U.S., fresh beets are often roasted. Eating them raw is more unusual, yet once you have, you may prefer them to the pickled versions that are high in sodium and may be packaged with added sugar. (Our recipe also tells you how to peel them without coloring your hands red.)

This week’s recipe marks our #499th issue. You can help us pick our milestone 500th Health-e-Recipe by voting in our Championship Round. It’s Lasagna versus Brussels sprouts: Vote in Recipe 500.